On this page, you will find generic descriptions of literature subjects that correspond to the MIT Bulletin (Course Catalog).

21L.522[J] International Women's Voices
(Same subject as 21G.022[J], WGS.141[J])
Prereq: none
3-0-9 HASS-H, CI-H

Introduces students to a variety of fictional works by contemporary women writers. International perspective emphasizes the extent, if any, there is an identifiable female voice that transcends national boundries. Uses a variety of interpretive perspectives, including sociohistorial, psychoanalytic, and feminist criticism, to examine texts. Authors include Mariama Ba, Isabel Aleende, Anita Desai, Maxine Hong Kingston, Toni Morrison, Doris Lessing, Alifa Riyaat, Yang Jiang, Nawal Al-Saadawi, and Sawako Ariyoshi. Taught in English. Limited enrollment.

21L.580 Translations
Prereq: none
3-0-9 HASS-A

Students study theories of translation, compare examples of multiple renderings of the same work, and work on translation projects. Supplementary assignments focus on adaptation of works from one genre to another, and on transmission of information from one mode to another (visual to verbal changes, American Sign Language, etc.). Students write essays about relative theories of translation and about comparisons of variant versions, and also work on translation projects of their own in workshop-format. Includes texts such as the King James Bible, and writers such as Walter Benjamin, George Steiner, Wislawa Szymborska, Czeslaw Milosz, Pablo Neruda, Gabriela Mistral, Rainer Maria Rilke, William Gass, and Robert Pinsky.

21L.590 Cultural Encounters: Global Literature Abroad (NEW IAP)
Prereq: none
3-3-3 HASS-H Can be repeated for credit

While living abroad, students study literature, art and history with a focus on the multi-national contexts of cultural production. Emphasis of the course will vary but it will always examine the dynamic exchange of culture beyond national borders, the relationship between geography, history and the literary imagination, and the different esthetic experience of seeing from within and seeing from the outside. Students study a variety of texts as well as music, dance and visual materials. Visits to museums, archives, and architectural sites are an integral part of this subject. May be repeated for credit with instructor’s permission so long as the content differs.

21L.601 Old English and Beowulf
(Same subject as 24.916J)
Prereq: none
3-0-9 HASS-H

Intensive introduction to Old English (also called Anglo-Saxon), the ancestor of modern English that was spoken in England ca. 600-1100. In the first half of the term, students use short prose texts to study the basics of Old English grammar. They go on to read short poems, and conclude by tackling portions of the epic Beowulf in the last third of the term. Assessment based upon translation work, daily vocabulary quizzes, and three exams.

21L.607 Greek I
Prereq: none
3-0-3; first half of term

Introduces rudiments of Greek to students with little or no prior knowledge of the subject. Aimed at laying a foundation to begin reading ancient and/or medieval literary and historical texts. Greek I and Greek II may be combined by petition (after completion of both) to count as a single HASS Elective.

Currently offered this semester:
21L.608 Greek II
Prereq: 21.607 or permission of instructor
3-0-3; second half of term

Introductory Greek subject for students with some prior knowledge of basic grammar and vocabulary. Intended to refresh and enrich ability to read ancient and/or medieval literary and historical texts. May be taken independently of Greek I with permission of instructor. Greek I and Greek II may be combined by petition (after completion of both) to count as a single HASS Elective.

Currently offered this semester:
21L.609 Greek Readings
Prereq: none
2-0-4

Introduction to reading ancient Greek literature in the original language. Provides a bridge between the study of Greek grammar and the reading of Greek authors. Improves knowledge of the language through careful examination of literary texts, both prose and poetry. Builds proficiency in reading Greek and develops appreciation for basic features of style and genre. Texts vary from term to term. May be repeated once for credit if content differs. 21L.609 and 21L.610, or two terms of 21L.609, may be combined by petition (after completion of both) to count as a single HASS-H.

21L.610 Advanced Greek Readings
Prereq: none
2-0-4

Building on 21L.609, develops the ability to read and analyze ancient Greek literary texts, both prose and poetry. Focuses on increasing fluency in reading comprehension and recognition of stylistic, generic, and grammatical features. Texts vary from term to term. May be repeated once for credit if content differs. 21L.610 and 21L.609, or two terms of 21L.610, may be combined by petition (after completion of both) to count as a single HASS-H.

21L.611 Latin I
Prereq: none
3-0-3; first half of term

Introduces rudiments of Latin to students with little or no prior knowledge of the subject. Aimed at laying a foundation to begin reading ancient and/or medieval literary and historical texts. Latin I and Latin II may be combined by petition (after completion of both) to count as a single HASS Elective. Limited to 20.

21L.612 Latin II
Prereq: 21L.611 or permission of instructor
3-0-3; second half of term

Introductory Latin subject for students with some prior knowledge of basic grammar and vocabulary. Intended to refresh and enrich ability to read ancient and/or medieval literary and historical texts. May be taken independently of Latin I with permission of instructor. Latin I and Latin II may be combined by petition (after completion of both) to count as a single HASS Elective. Limited to 20.

21L.613 Latin Readings
Prereq: none
2-0-4 HASS-H

Introduction to reading Latin literature in the original language. Provides a bridge between the study of Latin grammar and the reading of Latin authors. Improves knowledge of the language through careful examination of literary texts, focusing on prose and poetry in alternate years. Builds proficiency in reading Latin and develops appreciation for basic features of style and genre. Texts vary from term to term. May be repeated once for credit if content differs. 21L.613 and 21L.614, or two terms of 21L.613, may be combined by petition (after completion of both) to count as a single HASS-H.

Currently offered this semester:
21L.614 Advanced Latin Readings
Prereq: none
2-0-4 HASS-H

Building on 21L.613, develops the ability to read and analyze Latin literary texts, focusing on prose and poetry in alternate years. Increases fluency in reading comprehension and recognition of stylistic, generic, and grammatical features. Texts vary from term to term. May be repeated once for credit if content differs. 21L.613 and 21L.614, or two terms of 21L.614, may be combined by petition (after completion of both) to count as a single HASS-H.

Currently offered this semester:
21L.636[J] Introduction to Contemporary Hispanic Literature and Film
(Same subject as 21G.716[J])
Prereq: One intermediate subject in Spanish or permission of instructor
3-0-9 HASS-H

Studies important 20th- and 21st-century texts and films from both Spain and Latin America. Readings include short stories, theater, the novel, and poetry, as well as some non-fiction. Students acquire skills necessary for a serious examination of literacy and cultural issues in the Spanish-speaking world. Conducted entirely in Spanish. Emphasis on active participation of students in class discussion.

21L.637[J] Introduction to Hispanic Culture
(Same subject as 21G.717[J])
Prereq: One intermediate subject in Spanish or permission of instructor
3-0-9 HASS-H

Studies the major social, political, and aesthetic modes which have shaped Spanish civilization. Coordinates the study of literature, film, art, and architecture with the historical evolution of Spain. Readings and discussions focus on such topics as: the coexistence of Christians, Moors, and Jews; Imperial Spain; the First and Second Republics; and the contemporary period as background for the emergence of distinctively Spanish literary and artistic movements. Taught in Spanish. Limited to 18.

21L.638[J] Literature and Social Conflict: Perspectives on the Hispanic World
(Same subject as 21G.738[J])
Prereq: One intermediate subject in Spanish or permission of instructor
3-0-9 HASS-H

Considers how major literary texts illuminate principal issues in the evolution of modern Spanish society. Emphasizes the treatment of such major questions as the exile of liberals in 1820, the concept of progress, the place of religion, urbanization, rural conservatism and changing gender roles, and the Spanish Civil War. Authors include Perez Galdos, Pardo Bazan, Unamuno, Ortega y Gasset, Salinas, Lorca, La Pasionaria, and Falcon. Taught in Spanish.

21L.639[J] Globalization and its Discontents: Spanish-speaking Nations
(Same subject as 21G.739[J])
Prereq: One intermediate subject in Spanish or permission of instructor
3-0-9 HASS-H

Studies new paradigms of cultural exchange that have shaped Latin America in the 20th and 21st centuries. Examines how globalization is rapidly changing the identity of peoples and cultures in Spanish-speaking nations. Spotlights debates about human rights. Materials studied include film, fiction, essay, architectural archives, music and art. Students complete a research project about a specific aspect of Hispanic culture that has been shaped by contemporary forces in the global economy. Taught in Spanish with required readings and writing in Spanish.

21L.640[J] The New Spain: 1977-Present
(Same subject as 21G.740[J])
Prereq: One intermediate subject in Spanish or permission of instructor
3-0-9 HASS-H

Deals with the vast changes in Spanish social, political and cultural life that have taken place since the death of Franco. Topics include new freedom from censorship, the re-emergence of strong movements for regional autonomy (the Basque region and Catalonia), the new cinema including Almodovar and Saura, educational reforms instituted by the socialist government, and the fiction of Carme Riera and Terenci Moix. Special emphasis on the emergence of mass media as a vehicle for expression in Spain. Considers the changes wrought by Spain’s acceptance into the European Community. Materials include magazines, newspapers, films, fiction, and Amando de Miguel’s Los Españoles. Taught in Spanish.

Currently offered this semester: